Comment

5 Little-Known “Gotchas” That Make or Break a Pitch Deck

Every year, I look at hundreds of pitch decks. As a venture investor, it comes with the territory. Crafting a great pitch deck is the first step toward securing funding and making your great idea a reality. For entrepreneurs, the stakes are high.

Type “pitch deck advice” into Google, and you’ll get millions of results. There are tons of resources out there, and they all say basically the same thing. In a nutshell: Your pitch deck should be 15-25 slides long and contain basic information from your business plan. It should include the important details about your company’s story, competition, business model, forecast, and team. 

But for as much advice as there is online, little is said about the “gotchas”—those small details that trip entrepreneurs up and undermine their decks. The gotchas won’t necessarily prevent you from getting investors—but they will make it harder. 

Comment

Comment

The Rise of Third Generation Companies in Southeast Asia

This article was first published on Entrepreneur.com

Investors looking to capture tech-sector opportunities in Southeast Asia should look for a new of generation companies that can provide a comprehensive solution to consumers' needs. You might think that this new breed of problem-solving companies will thrive best in developed economies. However, I think that the most fertile ground for their development will be in emerging markets, such as Southeast Asia.

Comment

Comment

5 Ways To Localize as Your Startup Expands Regionally

In a vibrant region like Southeast Asia, expanding your business beyond the borders of your original market holds tremendous opportunities. A larger audience is only the beginning. 

Companies that expand across the region can bring incredible benefits for Southeast Asians as well. People in the region have vastly different experiences and knowledge that they can share. The Internet has already enabled more people in the region to share ideas and cultures, but businesses can—and should—positively contribute to this philosophy as well. 

Comment

Comment

Monk’s Hill Ventures Investment Principles

Since our founding in 2014, Monk’s Hill Ventures has invested in more than 20 fast-growing startups spanning multiple business models and industry verticals. In the process, we honed a set of principles to help us find the right entrepreneurs and to help the right entrepreneurs find us. 

We at MHV do believe in ‘the right to invest’ in our Founders and we spend considerable time with Founders to understand their motivations and business models. We back startups that have the potential to impact millions of people’s lives, led by passionate entrepreneurs who have the creativity, discipline, and drive to achieve massive scale. 

Comment

Comment

5 Questions LPs Often Ask Me About Venture Capital in Southeast Asia

More and more investors and LPs are becoming interested in Southeast Asia. This is no surprise, given the region’s strong long-term track record of economic growth. According to recent research by McKinsey, Southeast Asia is home to four of seven of the world’s highest-performing emerging economies: Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand. All four have seen per capita GDP growth of 3.5 percent annually since 1965. In addition, Southeast Asia’s tech startup ecosystem is at an inflection point, setting up the region’s economies for even more rapid acceleration in the years to come.

It’s also no surprise that when it comes to venture capital in Southeast Asia, LPs continue to have many questions about the emerging asset class. Here are a few questions I hear most often and our house views in response.

Comment

Comment

KKDay Harnesses the Power of Its Millennial Workforce to Drive Growth

This blog is part of our case study blog series featuring our portfolio companies. We asked Weichun Liu, co-founder of KKDay, a leading travel e-commerce platform in Southeast Asia, to share her insights on how KKDay harnesses the power of its millennial workforce to drive growth.

Millennials are often stereotyped as either lazy and self-absorbed or industrious and entrepreneurial. Research confirms that they fall into the latter camp, but no matter how they’re categorized, it’s impossible to ignore the fact that by 2020, their demographic will make up 35 percent of the global workforce.

So how can companies attract, hire and retain this newest legion of global workers? First, it’s important to understand that millennials are happiest in the workplace when they care about the people they work with—in short, they want their co-workers to feel like their second family. Rather than separate work from their personal lives, they desire a workplace that fosters relationships and meaningful connections. 

Our company, KKDay— a leading travel e-commerce platform that connects travellers and local tour providers—strives to do just that. From the second our new hires set foot in one of our new offices, they are mentored by veterans on our team. More importantly, no matter how early they are in their careers, our hires are treated as assets capable of making valuable contributions to our company. We treat our young employees like family, trusting them to develop products that speak to their values and ultimately influence the spending of other millennials. 

[more]

Comment

Comment

5 Steps to Scale Up Successfully in Southeast Asia’s Diverse Ecosystem

It is a time of unprecedented growth in Southeast Asia (SEA). Over the last few years, commercial innovation and investments have boomed. And investors are taking notice: $24 billion has been invested in Southeast Asian tech since 2015, according to a recent report by Google and Temasek.

There is a lot of opportunity in the region as it continues to grow. The same report predicts that Southeast Asia’s internet economy will reach $240 billion by 2025 — $40 billion more than previously estimated.

But scaling in SEA can be a challenge. It is one of the most diverse regions of the Asian continent, divided by politics, language and culture. Levels of development also vary from market to market: Singapore’s modern and metropolitan infrastructure contrasts starkly with Cambodia’s ongoing struggle to maintain a passenger rail service, for instance.

All of which means that there is no “Southeast Asia answer” to any question. But for startups, there are ways to overcome these challenges and turn this diversity into an opportunity as you expand your business across the region.

[more]

Comment

Comment

A Day in the Life: Jon Sugihara, Head of Strategic Partnerships for the Next Billion Users Group at Google

In the first meetings he arranged with potential partners for Google’s Next Billion Users (NBU) team, Jon Sugihara is looking for two things: Are we aligned on a project that could positively impact the next billion users of the Internet? And how fast can you move to test our hypothesis?

Working with partners at Google was a new experience. After years of trying to hard sell companies to invest in his own startup, Perx, or working hard to bring in new clients, companies were now hard selling to Jon for the first time. He quickly found that if he sat back and listened, partners would start pitching why they were the best partner for Google.

Jon had founded, developed and eventually advised his own company, but now he found himself on the other side of the table, working with established companies and startups alike to stretch beyond the successes they’d already achieved, and helping reshape a Google that will push emerging economies forward.

[more]

Comment

Comment

For Entrepreneurs in Southeast Asia, Regulations Are a Runway, Not a Roadblock

Navigating the regulatory landscape in Southeast Asia’s emerging markets might seem daunting, yet many entrepreneurs have already done so successfully. They’ve changed lives by launching successful startups, and they’ve also blazed a trail for others to follow. The problems at stake are too big and the potential benefits too great for entrepreneurs to risk sitting on their hands. Here is a quick playbook on navigating regulations in Southeast Asia and other emerging markets so that regulations become a runway rather than a roadblock.

Comment

Comment

Why the Next Wave of Vietnamese Startups Won’t Be Clones

VIETNAM—Vietnam’s thriving startup ecosystem is expected to reach $33 billion by 2025. But so far, the top tech companies have mostly cloned successful companies elsewhere rather than brewing something specific to Vietnamese culture and society. Tiki is Vietnam’s Amazon, Foody is its Meituan, and VNG is its Tencent.

I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with clones. In fact, they’ve brought a lot to Vietnamese society. These tech companies are making Vietnam more productive, more accessible, and more open. Thanks to them, we’re poised for the next wave, when entrepreneurs steeped in local culture begin brewing startups that specifically address Vietnamese issues and problems.

Comment

1 Comment

A Day In The Life: Vu Van, Co-founder & CEO of ELSA Speak

Roving between the company’s three offices in the U.S., Europe and Asia, ELSA CEO and co-founder Vu Van has few moments to spare. But if you do reach her for a conversation over the phone or Facetime, you may have a hard time placing her accent. Vu now lives in the San Francisco Bay Area, but when she first moved from Vietnam to earn a masters in education and business from Stanford University, she struggled to be understood.

[more]

1 Comment

Comment

Bits vs. Atoms: Why We Invest in Asset-Light Businesses

All of today’s most successful tech companies share one trait: they create value from bits much more so than from atoms.

Let me explain. Atoms are the physical assets of a business, such as inventory, property/infrastructure, and people. Bits are digital or otherwise intangible assets, including software and intellectual property. Bits can be more disruptive because they are more scalable, easier and faster to distribute, and cheaper than atoms (per unit revenues), and thus focusing in them to create value generates a much higher return on invested capital (ROIC). But profitability is just a benevolent side effect of the real rationale for bit-driven strategy: building innovative and efficient products that improve experiences and increase savings.

[more]

Comment

Comment

How To Pitch To VCs

Fundraising is not supposed to be inhibitive, by preparing and strategizing your pitch you can save up a lot of valuable time - time that you can spend building your startup. The reality is that VCs are constantly looking for great startups to invest. This piece is meant to be a guideline to help you strategize your next pitch and is based on my personal observations and experience.

A pitch to a VC can be broken down to 3 stages: before the pitch, during the pitch, and after the pitch.

[more]

Comment

Comment

In an AI World, Drop the Idea that Empathy is Feminine

This article was first published on InformationWeek.

Empathy makes someone a better employee, and we also need to build empathy into our artificial intelligence applications.

Traditionally undervalued in the tech industry, empathy — which is the ability to read and respond to another person’s feelings, thoughts and experiences — is a trait hiring managers and C-level executives can no longer ignore. After all, in a world where artificial intelligence will take up to 5 million jobs away from humans by 2020, the McKinsey Global Institute predicts that up to 14% of human workers will need to adapt to new occupations to secure our future in the workforce. In other words, as we start sharing the workforce with more machines, human soft skills such as empathy will be at a premium.

[more]

Comment

Comment

Through Razor-Sharp Focus, C88 Built Investor Confidence In An Innovative Business Model

By crafting itself as the fintech startup for emerging economies, C88 is striving to break down financial inequality.

Building a credit score system and establishing peer-to-bank communication that accommodates the unbanked and a growing middle class would be a bold move for any Southeast Asian business, let alone a five-year-old startup. But C88’s leadership team was fully aware of these challenges, and their clear-minded approach recently carried them through a bountiful series C fundraising round and into a dominant position in their markets.

C88 currently operates platforms and marketplaces in two Southeast Asian countries— www.CekAja.com is the largest financial platform in Indonesia, and www.eCompareMo.com holds the same distinction in the Philippines. Each site provides innovative services for local users, including comparison shopping for insurance, loans and credit cards. For banks and lenders, C88’s platforms offer crucial customer data and credit scores for millions of consumers. This data allows institutions to price services at fair and competitive rates for low- and middle-income users, while simultaneously educating users—particularly the unbanked—on available services and providers.

[more]

Comment

Comment

Watch, absorb, trust: Your job as a Mentee

Being a mentor is challenging. No question about it. It requires time, energy, and dedication. Not everybody is cut out for the gig. But here’s what no one tells you (or at least no one told me): being a mentee is also challenging.

Not everyone’s cut out for the role either.

Being a good mentee requires you to listen, watch, and learn—without always knowing why. That’s where patience and trust come in, attributes that don’t always come easily to young, ambitious people—the kind that experienced professionals are likely to take under their wings.

Let me give you an example.

[more]

Comment

Comment

2019 will be a pivotal year for Southeast Asian tech startups

This article was first published on The Next Web.

With a rising middle class and a booming tech startup scene, Southeast Asia (SEA) sits where China did 10 years ago—on the cusp of a major economic boom fueled by the tech industry. The only questions over the last few years have been: When will the tipping point be reached, and when will SEA mature from a promising regional market into the next big world economy? I’ve seen promising signs that in 2019, our region may finally reach that tipping point.

The 10 nations in SEA (Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Vietnam, Thailand, Brunei, Laos, Myanmar and the Philippines) are projected to become the fifth largest economy in the world by 2020. More importantly, though, local companies are driving much of the growth. SEA is now home to eight unicorns—tech startups valued at US$1 billion or more—including Grab, the ride-hailing company that beat out Uber for regional dominance in early 2018.

For these burgeoning tech giants, expanding outside of SEA is an obvious next step. Tech startups will also continue to take the lead in bolstering the regional economy. Here are three of my predictions for where SEA startups will go in 2019.

[more]

Comment

Comment

How Influencer Platform escapex Plans to go Global

Today not all celebrities are made at the box office or in a recording studio. Though a hit movie or single can help, many launch their careers or find new, devoted fans on platforms like YouTube, Instagram, and Twitter. They’ve become influencers, and their social media presence brings them closer to their fans than ever before.

Even as celebrities have become increasingly reliant on social media, however, many have become frustrated with its limitations. Popular platforms nurture creators but too often deny them control over what they create—and how it is monetized. That’s where influencer platform escapex comes in. Founded four years ago, the Singapore-based startup aims to create a new social currency that will improve the experience for influencers, brands and followers alike.

[more]

Comment