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Life Projects & Purpose

College of Engineering Fall Convocation
Krannert Center
University of Illinios at Urbana-Champaign
December 17, 2016
Peng T. Ong
http://cs.illinois.edu/news/alumnus-peng-ong-will-be-featured-speaker-fall-convocation

 

Introduction

I am honored to be able to talk to you today.

Congratulations on making it to this point, at one of the world’s top engineering schools.

Now what? We each have about a 100 years on the planet. (Yes, ... you've got approximately 80 left.)

I know many of you already have a job lined up. Have you thought about how the next few years of your life tees you up for the rest of it?

As an entrepreneur, and then a VC, I have spent a lot of my time talking to many highly-accomplished individuals about what drives them... about their purpose.

One of the hardest challenges that many people face is in deciding on a purpose. Yes, I did say deciding. Not finding. Not discovering. Not searching for.

You have to decide on your purpose, or it will literally not really be YOUR PURPOSE.

I would like to use our next few minutes to tell you about three things I'm spending time on because of my purpose.

My "Life Projects", as I call them.

What I hope for is that they prompt you to think about and decide on your own purpose. 

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You have 100 years on this planet, and then you will be gone. What are you going to do with it? The way I see it, there are three routes you could take... [...]

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